[Conference] Complementary currencies and societal challenges – Call for Papers

Call for Papers

International conference on complementary currencies

Complementary currencies and societal challenges:

Crossing academic and practitioners knowledge/perspectives

Time: 21-22 November, 2019 

Venue: Brussels, Belgium

Institutional organizers of the research seminar: the Centre for European Research in Microfinance (CERMi) and the Research Association on Monetary Innovation and Community and Complementary Currency Systems (RAMICS)

The surge of growth of cryptocurrencies and digital money have recently caught the attention of both management scholars and practitioners (Brière et al., 2015; Dodgson et al., 2015; Iansiti & Lakhani, 2017; Lehr & Lamb, 2018; Michelman, 2017; Posnett, 2015; Vergne & Swain, 2017). However, cryptocurrencies are only one of the latest forms of complementary currencies (Blanc, 2016). Before the emergence of cryptocurrencies, complementary currencies were mainly conceived of and issued by citizens, nonprofits, businesses, and even local public administrations, and circulated within a defined geographical region or community (Cohen, 2017; Dissaux & Fare, 2017; Guéorguieva-Bringuier & Ottaviani, 2018; Lietaer, 2001). Also known as local, social, regional and alternative currencies, these complementary currency systems are often developed to respond to societal needs and aspirations that official currencies do not address (Meyer & Hudon, 2017; Fraňková et al., 2017; North, 2007). Specifically, they can be designed to promote sustainable behavior, build community social capital, and foster trade and local development (Blanc & Fare, 2013; Collom, 2007; Gomez & Helmsing, 2008; Marshall & O’Neill, 2018; Seyfang & Longhurst, 2013). For example, inter-enterprise currencies are mainly used in business-to-business networks in order to facilitate the exchange of goods and services between small and medium-sized enterprises (Meyer & Hudon, Forthcoming; Stodder, 2009).

Complementary currencies are socio-economic innovations aiming to address societal challenges of social cohesion, economic inclusion and environmental preservation (Stodder, 2009; Joachain & Klopfert, 2014; Michel & Hudon, 2015, Sanz, 2016). This conference aims to gather researchers and practitioners to explore and debate the potential of complementary currencies for sustainable development and socio-economic resilience (Ulanowicz et al., 2009; Gregory, 2014; Graugaard, 2012). We believe that the topic is one that is predestined for cross-disciplinary research and for thinking beyond established boundaries. We invite conceptual and empirical submissions drawing on a range of theoretical perspectives and diverse methodologies to explore complementary currencies, including researchers working on cryptocurrencies.

The Complementary Currencies and Societal Challenges conference will be held in Brussels, Belgium. The event is designed to include academic and practitioner knowledge and will be organized in two days:

  • November 21 (evening) – Closing event of (E)change Bruxelles project co-organized with Financité

This social event closes the (E)change Bruxelles action-research project co-organized between the Universite libre de Bruxelles and Financite. It celebrates the emergence of the new Brussels local currency ‘La Zinne’. Researchers participating to the research seminar of the 22nd November are welcome to join this social event, although it is not compulsory.

  • November 22: A research seminar (in English) on the following 5 themes:
    • CC and urban resilience
    • CC and civil society
    • Technology and CC
    • CC and entrepreneurship
    • Ethics and CC

Authors who wish to present their papers at the research seminar should submit electronically a three-page abstract by 01 September 2019 to the following mail address cermi@ulb.ac.be (with mhudon@ulb.ac.be in Cc), specifying to which of the 5 themes they wish to bring their contribution. Abstracts will be selected and authors will be notified and invited by 15 September 2019. A full paper will be due on 01 November 2019.

For questions, please contact Marek Hudon (mhudon@ulb.ac.be); Hélène Joachain (helene.joachain@ulb.ac.be) and Camille Meyer (cmeyer@uvic.ca)

We are looking forward to welcoming you on this Complementary Currencies and Societal Challenges event!

Scientific committee

Jérôme Blanc (Science-Po Lyon; Université Lumière-Lyon 2)

Tristan Dissaux (Université Lumière-Lyon 2)

Marie Fare (Université Lumière-Lyon 2)

Georgina Gomez (Erasmus University)

Marek Hudon (ULB) – Local Organizer

Hélène Joachain (ULB) – Local Organizer

Marc Labie (UMONS)

Camille Meyer (Universiy of Victoria)

Ariane Szafarz (ULB)

References

Blanc, J., Fare, M. 2013. Understanding the role of governments and administrations in the implementation of community and complementary currencies. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, 84(1), 63-81.

Blanc, J. 2016. Unpacking monetary complementarity and competition: a conceptual framework. Cambridge Journal of Economics, 41(1), 239-257.

Brière, M., Oosterlinck, K., Szafarz, A. 2015. Virtual currency, tangible return: Portfolio diversification with Bitcoin. Journal of Asset Management, 16(6), 365-373.

Collom, E. 2007. The motivations, engagement, satisfaction, outcomes and demographics of time bank participants: Survey findings from a U.S. system. International Journal of Community Currency Research, 11, 36-83

Dissaux, T, Fare, M. 2017. A collective redefinition of money: The case of the local currency “La Gonette” in Lyon, France. 29th annual SASE conference, Lyon.

Fraňková, E., Fousek, J., Kala, L., Labohý, J. 2014. Transaction network analysis for studying Local Exchange Trading Systems (LETS): Research potentials and limitations. Ecological Economics, 107, 266-275.

Gómez, G.M., Dini, P., 2016. Making sense of a crank case: monetary diversity in Argentina (1999–2003). Cambridge Journal of Economics 40, 1421–1437.

Graugaard, J. D. 2012. A tool for building community resilience? A case study of the Lewes Pound. Local Environment, 17(2), 243-260.

Gregory, L. 2014. Resilience or resistance? Time banking in the age of austerity. Journal of Contemporary European Studies, 22(2), 171-183.

Guéorguieva-Bringuier, L., Ottaviani, F. 2018. Opposition and isomorphism with the neoliberal logic in community exchange systems. Ecological Economics, 149, 88-97.

Gomez, G.M, Helmsing, A.H.J. 2008. Selective spatial closure and local economic development: What do we learn from the argentine local currency systems? World Development, 36(11), 2489-2511

Joachain, H., Klopfert, F. 2014. Smarter than metering? Coupling smart meters and complementary currencies to reinforce the motivation of households for energy savings. Ecological Economics 105, 89-96.

Meyer, C., Hudon, M. (forthcoming). Money and the commons: An investigation of complementary currencies and their ethical implications. Journal of Business Ethics.

Meyer, C., Hudon, M. 2017. Alternative organizations in finance: Commoning in complementary currencies. Organization, 24(5), 629-647.

Michel, A., Hudon, M. 2015. Community currencies and sustainable development: A systematic review. Ecological Economics, 116, pp. 160–171.

Marshall, A. P., O’Neill, D. W. 2018. The Bristol Pound: A tool for localisation?. Ecological Economics, 146, 273-281.

Sanz, E. O. 2016. Community currency (CCs) in Spain: An empirical study of their social effects. Ecological Economics, 121, 20-27.

Stodder, J. 2009. Complementary credit networks and macro-economic stability: Switzerland’s Wirtschaftsring. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 72, 79–95.

Ulanowicz, R. E., Goerner, S. J., Lietaer, B., Gomez, R. 2009. Quantifying sustainability: Resilience, efficiency and the return of information theory. Ecological complexity, 6(1), 27-36.

[5th RAMICS Congress – Call for Papers] Deadline Postponed to the 14th of May

Here is a reminder on the call for papers for the 5th RAMICS Congress, to be held in Japan, Sept. 11-15th.

The deadline has been postponed to May, 14th.

Proposals dealing with community and complementary currencies, under digital forms or not, and with monetary innovation, are welcome.

Don’t hesitate to visit the website of the congress and of RAMICS association.

[RAMICS] Best Paper Award – Japan 2019

The Research Association on Monetary Innovation and Community and Complementary Currency Systems (RAMICS), in partnership with the International Journal of Community Currency Research (IJCCR) and the Bibliography Databank of Community Currency Research (CC-literature), announces the launch of the first edition of the RAMICS’ Best Paper Award on monetary innovation and complementary currency systems.

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This initiative aims to promote research that improves the present understanding of the state, the development and the potentialities of monetary innovation, complementary currency systems and any case of money-based social exchange systems as well. It takes place in the framework of RAMICS biennial congresses. In addition, it seeks to facilitate and strengthen the relationships between those who act in the field of complementary currency research and the movements of activists on the subject, articulating research and practice, rigorous academic reflection and promotion of social change.

Consequently, RAMICS’ Fifth International Congress on Monetary Innovation and Complementary Currency Systems, to be held in Japan – Hida-Takayama, on Sept. 11-15th, 2019, will introduce the first edition of this Best Paper Award, for a paper written in English, considering criteria of originality, relevance, and academic quality.

 Selection process

The selection will take place considering the papers accepted by the international scientific committee of the Congress, and presented during the Congress.

The winner of the award will be announced during the Congress in attendance of the author or at least one author if the paper is co-authored.

The jury may renounce to grant the award if it considers that the competing papers do not meet the expected quality and relevance requirements.

Contest rules

Research norms of an academic paper

Please remember that an academic paper is not a social commentary, an opinion or a “blog”. An academic paper begins with a thesis – the writer of the academic paper aims to persuade readers of an idea or solution to a problem, based on empirical qualitative or quantitative evidence or on theoretical and conceptual analysis. A paper should be structured on a research question that is presented and explained in the introductory section, with reference to the existing literature.

Academic writing should present the reader with an informed argument. The research process is not simply collecting data, evidence, or “facts,” then copy-and-pasting” this preexisting information into a paper. Instead, the research process is about the investigation — asking questions and developing answers through serious critical thinking and thoughtful reflection.

Conditions to be part of the contest

– Articles should be original unpublished material, and not submitted for publication elsewhere.

– Essays will be accepted written English

– Provisional versions or works that have obtained a local, national or international prize will not be accepted.

– The articles must be submitted to RAMICS Congress for presentation, then accepted and presented.

– The applying papers must follow the presentation guidelines that will be circulated in the call for papers of the Congress.

Topics of the papers

– The articles should be based on the thematic areas proposed in the call for papers and guidelines of the RAMICS 5th Congress.

– The work may consist of an analysis of cases and/or theoretical reflections related to the suggested topics.

– Presentations of an individual or collective authorship with no more than three authors will be accepted. In the case of collective essays, the award will be the only one per work.

 The award

The awarded paper will receive an amount of 300 euros. The amount is not per author but per paper, and in the case of multiple authorship, the authors should share this amount.

The awarded paper will be published in the issue of the International Journal of Community Currency Research (IJCCR) that corresponds with the proceedings of the Congress. It will be indexed consequently in the Bibliography of Community Currency Research (CC-literature).

The winners are committed to delivering the final essays adapted to the editorial standards of RAMICS/IJCCR.

 

 

[5th RAMICS Congress – Call for Papers] Deadline Postponed to the 30th of April

Dear colleagues,

Here is a reminder on the call for papers for the 5th RAMICS Congress, to be held in Japan, Sept. 11-15th.

The deadline has been postponed to April, 30th.

Proposals dealing with community and complementary currencies, under digital forms or not, and with monetary innovation, are welcome.

Don’t hesitate to visit the website of the congress and of RAMICS association.

Regards,

Jérôme Blanc

President of RAMICS


5th Biennial RAMICS International Congress in Japan

Going Digital? New Possibilities of Digital-Community Currency Systems”

11th-15th September 2019, Hida-Takayama, Japan

Important Dates

Submitting abstracts by March 31st, 2019 April 30th, 2019 (Japan Standard Time) *The deadline extended.

Notification of acceptance by April 30th, 2019 May 31st, 2019 (Japan Standard Time)

Submitting full papers by July 12th, 2019 (Japan Standard Time)

*Abstracts and full papers must be submitted through the online submission system, EasyChair (https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ramics2019hidatakaya). You have to make an EasyChair account and log in.

Registration

{ Users from China – Registration }

Call for Papers

Contact

RAMICS 2019 Hida-Takayama Organizing Committee

ramics2019takayama@googlegroups.com

Senshu University Digital-Community Currency Consortium Laboratory

(Laboratory 1410, Building 1, 2-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8580, Japan.)

Organizing Committee

  • Pr. Makoto Nishibe (General Chair)
  • Pr. Masayuki Yoshida (Co-General Chair)
  • Masahiko Yamazaki (Co-General Chair)
  • Shigeto Kobayashi (Secretary-General)
  • Kazushige Yamakoshi
  • Ken-ichi Kurita
  • Masaaki Ikeda
  • Yoshihisa Miyazaki
  • Ikuma Fujiwara
  • Pr. Masaaki Yoshida
  • Pr. Takashi Hashimoto
  • Hidetoshi Sawa
  • Pr. Masahiro Mikami

Location

The Takayama Cultural Hall in Takayama.

1-188-1 Showa-machi, Takayama, Gifu, 506-0053 Japan

Main transportation network (Shinkansen, expressway, airport location) from Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya to Takayama

In memoriam – Bernard Lietaer 

In memoriam
Bernard Lietaer
(Lauwe, 7 febbraio 1942 – Hoherhagen, 4 febbraio 2019)
Bernard Lietaer passed away on Feb. 4th, 2019. RAMICS expresses its condolences and sympathy to his family and friends.
Bernard Lietaer published many inspiring books and articles that helped shift the lines toward the recognition of the interest of complementary currencies for sustainability, and built a common ground for thinking and conceiving complementary currencies. He was a forerunner in money matters, advocating for the diversity of currencies, against the “monoculture of money” that, according to him, characterized our current monetary systems.
Among a great variety of conferences, Bernard logically attended the first international conferences on complementary currencies (Lyon 2011, The Hague 2013). He also published a couple of papers in the IJCCR  Some of his bibliographical data can be found on the CC Literature databank. Overall, his website, entitled Currency solutions for a wiser world, contains plenty of documents and papers of his.
Bernard Lietaer will be greatly missed.

New Books 2018

1. Monetary Plurality in Local, Regional and Global Economies
Routledge: 

by Georgina M. Gómez (ed.) (International Institute of Social Studies – Erasmus University)

Description. The idea that each country should have one currency is so deeply rooted in people’s minds that the possibility of multiple and concurrent currencies seems unthinkable. Monetary systems contribute to problems of high unemployment and social distress during financial and economic crisis, so reforms to increase the responsiveness and flexibility of the monetary system can be part of the solution.
This book discusses ‘monetary plurality’, which is the circulation of several currencies at the same time and space. It addresses how multiple currency circuits work together and transform socio-economic systems, particularly by supporting economies at the local level of regions and cities. The book shows that monetary plurality has been ubiquitous throughout history and persists at present because the existence of several currency circuits facilitates small-scale production and trade in a way that no single currency can accomplish on its own.
Monetary plurality can improve resilience, access to livelihoods and economic sustainability. At the same time, it introduces new risks in terms of economic governance, so it needs to be properly understood. The book analyses experiences of monetary plurality in Europe, Japan, and North and South America, written by researchers from East and West and from the global North and South. Replete with case studies, this book will prove a valuable addition to any student or practitioner’s bookshelf.
1. The monetary system as an evolutionary construct – Georgina M. Gómez;
2. Monetary Plurality in Economic Theory – Jérôme Blanc, Ludovic Desmedt, Laurent Le Maux, Jaime Marques-Pereira, Pepita Ould-Ahmed and Bruno Théret;
3. Making sense of the plurality of money: a Polanyian attempt – Jérôme Blanc;
4. How does monetary plurality work at the household level? The division of labour among currencies in Argentina (1998-2005) – Georgina M. Gómez;
5. Monetary federalism as A concept and its Empirical underpinnings in Argentina’s monetary history – Bruno Théret;
6. Famine of Cash: Why Have Local Monies Remained Popular throughout Human History? Akinobu Kuroda;
7. The pervasiveness of monetary plurality in economic crisis and wars – Georgina M. Gómez and Wilko von Prittwitz und Gaffron;
8. Birth, Life and Death of a Provincial Complementary Currency from Tucuman, Argentina (1985 – 2003) – Bruno Théret;
9. Community Currency and Sustainable Development in Hilly and Mountainous Areas: A Case Study of Forest Volunteer Activities in Japan – Yoshihisa Miyazaki and Ken-ichi Kurita;
10. Sustainable Territorial Development and Monetary Subsidiarity – Marie Fare;
11. Relationship between people’s money consciousness and circulation of community currency –  Shigeto Kobayashi, Takashi Hashimoto, Ken-ichi Kurita and Makoto Nishibe;
12. Gaming Simulation using Electronic Community Currencies: Behavioural Analysis of Self-versus-Community Consciousness – Masahiro Mikami and Makoto Nishibe;
13. For the policy maker: when and how is monetary plurality an option – Georgina M. Gómez.

Source: https://www.routledge.com/Monetary-Plurality-in-Local-Regional-and-Global-Economies/Gomez/p/book/9781138280281

2. Das Geld neu erfinden: Alternative Währungen verstehen und nutzen, Versus: Zürich

by Jens Martignoni

The author provides with this book a very good introduction to the topic of „alternative currencies“ for the general public.

Description. Die Finanzkrise hat deutlich gemacht, dass Geldsystem und Währung entscheidenden Einfluss auf das Funktionieren unserer Wirtschaft nehmen – und dieses auch empfindlich stören können. Entsprechend ist das Vertrauen in das bestehende Finanzsystem stark erschüttert. Gibt es nicht ganz andere Geld- und Währungsmodelle? Solche, die wieder ein festes Fundament für eine nachhaltige und zukunftsfähige Wirtschaft bilden könnten?
Jens Martignoni gibt in einfacher und knapper Form einen Überblick über die aktuelle Diskussion zum Thema alternative Währungen und stellt die erfolgreichsten Beispiele vor. Dabei spannt er den Bogen von Quartier- und Lokalwährungen über Gutscheinsysteme bis hin zu neuesten Entwicklungen der Fintech.
Das Buch vermittelt Leserinnen und Lesern das Wissen, um sich zu orientieren, mitzureden und auch mitzutun, indem sie selbst solche Währungen nutzen oder sich an neuen Konzepten.

Source: http://www.versus.ch/index.html?text_id=110&aktion=vollanzeige&artikelnummer=376

 

3. Les monnaies alternatives
by Jérôme Blanc (Triangle, Sciences Po Lyon, France)

Description. Les monnaies alternatives sont des dispositifs monétaires mis au service d’une transformation socioéconomique. Depuis le début des années 1980, elles se sont multipliées et se sont diversifiées dans un grand nombre de pays, selon une ampleur inédite à l’échelle des sociétés industrielles. C’est un bilan analytique de cette dynamique que propose cet ouvrage.
Dans ce but, il établit une typologie des monnaies alternatives en sept groupes, des SEL aux cryptomonnaies en passant par les banques de temps et les monnaies locales. Après avoir précisé les finalités et les cadres théoriques et doctrinaux de ces monnaies, il distingue des monnaies par lesquelles est recherchée en priorité une transformation sociale et d’autres par lesquelles c’est l’orientation du système économique qui est d’abord visée. Il analyse la place respective de l’échange marchand et de la réciprocité selon les dispositifs. Il évalue enfin leurs réussites et leurs difficultés, en soulignant les deux enjeux importants que sont leur contribution à une radicalisation démocratique et l’hypermonétarisation qu’elles favorisent.

Source: https://www.collectionreperes.com/catalogue/index-Les_monnaies_alternatives-9782707186362.html

 

4. Time Bank as a Complementary Economic System: Emerging Research and Opportunities
by Lukas Valek (University of Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic) and Vladimir Bures (University of Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic)

Description. Contemporary research in the field of time-based currency has generally been unstructured and takes a retrospective point of view. In practice, approaches to this field commonly taken until now have shown that there can be as many points of view as there are researchers. Time Bank as a Complementary Economic System: Emerging Research and Opportunities provides a systemic study of a soft system called the Time Bank, a reciprocal service exchange that uses units of time as currency. This publication explores the contemporary context of Time Bank and describes the most recent research methodologies and results. Its content represents the work of business exchange, knowledge management, and soft systems, and it is designed for economists, managers, business professionals, social scientists, academicians, and researchers seeking coverage on topics centered on soft systems and their economic influence.

Source: https://www.igi-global.com/book/time-bank-complementary-economic-system/201847

 

 

[Conference] 11th International Social Innovation Research Conference – Call for papers

11th International Social Innovation Research Conference – ISIRC 2019

Please find below the call for papers for ‘11th International Social Innovation Research Conference.’ One of the streams (‘Alternative economic organising for social innovation: Ecologies of context and relations‘) mentions specifically community currencies. This stream draws on the “diverse economies” approach.

Read the full description of the panel Alternative economic organising for social innovation: Ecologies of context and relations.

Paper abstracts 

Paper abstracts must be maximum 300 words, excluding references. They should articulate: the research objectives or questions being addressed; the conceptual or theoretical perspectives informing the work; where appropriate, the methodology utilized; and the contribution of the paper to knowledge in light of the conference themes.

Optional full paper submission for consideration in best paper awards is due no later than 31st July 2019.

A maximum of two abstracts may be submitted per presenter (joint papers to be presented by co-authors will also be considered).

All paper abstracts must be submitted to isirc2019@gcu.ac.ukOn abstract submission please ensure you advise the conference stream.

Panel proposals
Panel proposals must be maximum 400 words, excluding references. They should include: the panel purpose and its relationship to the nominated conference stream; details of (minimum) three and (maximum) four papers and paper presenters to be included in the panel; and the expected contribution to the panel.
All panel proposals must be submitted to isirc2019@gcu.ac.uk

Best Paper Competition 
Paper Submission:
To be eligible for the Best Paper awards you will need to submit a full paper by July 31st.  Papers should be submitted to isirc2019@gcu.ac.uk

Article files should be provided in Microsoft Word format in font 12 with double spacing. Articles should be between 6500 and 9500 words in length with a maximum 300 word abstract. This includes all text including references and appendices. You should provide a title page with details of authors. References to other publications must be in Harvard style and carefully checked for completeness, accuracy and consistency.
•          All tables and figures/diagrams should be included in the text
•          Selected full papers will be fast-tracked for publication in Special Editions of: the Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise Journal

​Indicative deadlines
Abstract and panel proposals submission: Closes 28th February 2019
Decision on submissions: Notification by 31st March 2019
Full papers submitted for consideration in best paper awards due: 31st July 2019 

Enquiries about conference administration and technical issues related to online submission should be directed to the conference administration team at isirc2019@gcu.ac.uk

More info at the original sources:

http://www.isircconference2019.com/call-for-papers.html

http://www.isircconference2019.com/uploads/1/2/0/0/120062879/alternative_economic_organising_for_social_innovation_ecologies_of_context_and_relations.pdf