[Call for Papers] Rethinking Money, Rebuilding Communities: A Multidimensional Analysis of Crypto and Complementary Currencies

CALL FOR PAPER, PACO 13(1): 2020

PARTECIPAZIONE E CONFLITTO,  issue 1, 2020

Call for paper for the Special issue on:

“Rethinking Money, Rebuilding Communities. A Multidimensional Analysis of Crypto and Complementary Currencies”.

Guest Editors:

Marco Fama, Università della Calabria, Università di Bergamo

Ricardo Orzi, Universidad Nacional de Luján, Argentina

Stefano Lucarelli, Università di Bergamo, CNRS Paris

Call for Papers:

The overall goal of this special issue is to stimulate the debate on the experiences of monetary innovation emerged after the 2007 financial crisis, exploring in depth their multiple social, economic and political dimensions.

In particular, the special issue aims to provide a theoretical interpretation and an empirical survey of Crypto Currencies and Complementary Currencies, understood as innovative social technologies that have the potential of charging social and economic relations of new meanings, enabling the pursuit of a set of collectively defined goals which the exclusive circulation of official money could not achieve.

We assume that, in the current context of economic and environmental crises, social innovations in the monetary field could play a fundamental role in building connections among communities and in triggering virtuous mechanisms of wealth creation and distribution that better respond to local needs. However, ongoing experiments are still too marginal and its concrete effects largely uninvestigated.

Complementary Currencies are generally portrayed as tools able to enhance the resilience of local communities, strengthening exchanges, trust and cooperation among its users. However, there still is little empirical evidence on its socio-economic impact, also due to the persistence of unsolved methodological controversies. In any case, evaluation models should not be limited to the identification of quantitative variables and indicators, but attempt to bring to light the multiple social and political implications of the phenomenon.

Crypto Currencies are a different, and in many aspects more controversial, phenomenon. However, its underlying technologies have opened new interesting possibilities that are now being explored also in more socially-oriented experiences which call for attention.

In both cases, focusing on the strictly intertwined social, economic and symbolic dimensions of the ongoing experiments is fundamental to gain insight and to provide helpful recommendations for practitioners and policy makers.

This special issues aims to nourish the academic and public debate on monetary innovations with rigorous analysis based on an interdisciplinary approach, integrating sociological, political and economic perspectives. It welcomes papers that investigate the socio-economic impact of Crypto Currencies and Complementary Currencies, exploring their limits and potentialities, as well as the underlying participation processes, possible conflicts and contradictions.

Articles, employing different theoretical, empirical and methodological approaches, should explore one or more of the following thematic areas:

  • analysis on the nexus between money and social behaviour, focusing on whether and how this relationship is redefined in alternative monetary circuits;
  • epistemological and methodological reflections on evaluation procedures of Complementary and Crypto Currencies;
  • case study analysis with a particular focus on participation processes, subjectivities involved and the political and symbolic dimensions;
  • evaluation of experiences of monetary innovation and their impact on trust, social capital and local development;
  • identification of best practices and analysis of the possible role of institutions in supporting experiences of monetary innovations.

Timeline:

Articles, written in English, should be submitted to the editors according to the following schedule:

–  Submission of long abstracts (about 1,000 words): 15th of April 2019

–  Selection of long abstracts: 10th of May 2019

–  Submission of full articles: 27th of August 2019

–  Provision of peer review feedback: 15th of October 2019 June 2019

–  Submission of revised drafts: 30th of January 2020

–  Publication of the issue: 15th of March 2020

Articles should be no longer than 10,000 words, including notes and references. A maximum of 10 articles will be published.

Please refer to the editorial guidelines available at:

http://siba-ese.unisalento.it/index.php/paco/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Please address any queries to the Editors – Proposals and papers have to be sent to the guest editors:

marco.fama@unibg.it

ricardoorzi@gmail.com

stefano.lucarelli@unibg.it

Original Source: http://siba-ese.unisalento.it/index.php/paco/announcement/view/86

[Call for Papers] Money in the 21st Century: Digital Exchange, Extra-State Currencies, and the Relational Character of Money

Guest editorHernán Borisonik (researcher, National Scientific and Technical Research Council, CONICET)

Submission deadline: 1 December 2018

To be published in: issue 24 (July 2019)

Author guidelines: https://digithum.uoc.edu/about/submissions/

 

About the journal

Digithum is an open-access scientific e-journal published by the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya and Universidad de Antioquia (Colombia). The main focus of this journal is the relational perspective on the analysis of our subjective experiences, our social bonds and our cultural heritage.

This journal is indexed in the sector’s leading scientific journal impact and assessment databases like SCOPUS (Elsevier), SJR, ESCI (Clarivate), and more.

About guest editor

Political scientist and PhD graduate in social science from the University of Buenos Aires, where he lectures in political theory at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. He is a researcher for the National Scientific and Technical Research Council (Conicet) and the Gino Germani Research Institute (IIGG). He directs and participates in diverse investigative projects related to political theory and philosophy. He also collaborates with artists. He has published and co-edited different academic volumes and is the author of the books “Dinero sagrado. Política, economía y sacralidad en Aristóteles” (Sacred Money. Politics, economy and sacredness in Aristotle) [2013] and “Soporte. El uso del dinero como material en las artes visuales” (Support. Money as Material in Visual Arts) [2017].

Subject area

Scholars are invited to submit manuscripts for possible inclusion in Digithum. All manuscripts will be subject to peer review, with timely feedback provided to authors.

Articles should focus on the social consequences of new forms of exchange, especially in digital contexts in which the boundaries of states tend to become ill-defined and porous. How do crypto currencies are influencing or will influence societies? What does the use of new forms of non-state exchange (apps, messengers) imply at the level of social relations?

Especially welcomed will be those contributions that focus upon:

New cultural phenomena related to digital economic exchange (blockchain, decentralized and/or peer-to-peer transactions, anonymous trading).

Extra-State Money (brand-based money, banks or corporations currencies).

New forms of exchanging money in low-income societies, and the interactions that this entails (mobile payments or banking, etc.).

Socialization and sociability in digital contexts of monetary exchange.

Financial market autonomization or automatization.

Forms of local currencies in relation to the general (globalized) economic context.

Submission and publication guidelines

Articles should not exceed 8000 words and must contain the following information:

  • Title
  • Abstract (200 words) with the essential features and results of the work
  • Keywords (4 to 6)
  • The body of the text, structured into sections and sub-sections
  • Bibliography
  • Author details (name and surname, professional affiliation, professional postal address, electronic address)
  • Brief CV (100-200 words) and photograph

Articles can be written in Catalan, English or Spanish.

Check Submission process to send your paper.

For any technical issues, please send a message to: publicacions@uoc.edu

Original source: https://digithum.uoc.edu/about/call-for-papers-july-19/

[Call for EU COST Proposal – AnDroMeDA Project] Assessment of Distributed Ledger Technology for Multi-Domain services Adoption: Hoax or Opportunity?

The Main Proposer Dr. Antonio Carnevale opens to RAMICS members for collaboration on AnDroMeDA project. The project is focused on Distributed Ledger Technologies and their applications, also for community development and monetary innovation. The proposal has been already submitted as EU COST project, but it is possible to contact Dr. Andrea Carnevale to be involved in it.

The aims of AnDroMeDA are (1) providing a map of the concepts and outlining a multidisciplinary vocabulary of DLTs  (Distributed Ledger Technologies) use; (2) stimulating and coordinating more specific research projects to compare current knowledge and real experiences about how DLTs can really find applications in different societal and strategic fields; (3) developing a pan-European network that can help Early Career Investigators (ECI) to grow up; (4) to release disseminative materials that synthetically illustrate criticalities and opportunities of DLTs.

Ledgers have been at the heart of commerce since ancient times. However, in all this time the only notable innovation has been computerization, which initially was simply a transfer from paper to bytes. Now, for the first time, Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) enables the collaborative creation of digital ledgers with properties and capabilities that go far beyond traditional paper-based ledgers. Their tangible innovative character is that DLTs can operate smoothly and securely without the need of being controlled and administered by a central or third party. This makes DLT a potentially radical change in the future mentality and methods that lead both the governance and management of techno-science and the participation of people in decision-making processes. It is evident that, according to these premises, DLTs have been rapidly elected as the object of controversial debates: are they a real opportunity or only a promise?

For more information, please contact Dr. Antonio Carnevale at alephkaf@gmail.com.